Norway Declares That All Fur Farming Factories To Be Shutdown In The Near Future

- in Animals, Uplifting
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Norway is one of the 14th European countries to phase out fur farming. Prime Minister Erna Solberg from Norway’s Conservative Party decided as part of a deal with the anti-fur Liberal Party.

The total ban on fur farming was introduced in 2018 and will phase out the fur farms entirely by the year 2025. 

In Norway, there are roughly about 300 fur farms. PETA reported that around 11,000 foxes and 700,000 minks bred for extermination each year, which produces approximately one million pelts a year in Norway alone.

Due to the banning, this marks a massive victory for the animals, a move that has dismayed producers and delighted animal rights activists.

The decision to ban fur farms is included in the Norwegian government platform, which states that: The government will implement a controlled shut down of the fur animal industry. It aims to promote a bill to the Storting on a ban on fur animal husbandry with an arrangement period of pre-existing farmers until the end of 2024/25.

Animal welfare organizations were pleased with the news.

Siri Martinsen of NOAH animal rights group leader was extremely pleased. After about 30 years of hard work and struggles by animal friends and animal organizations. He also said that the plan seemed to have majority support in Norway’s parliament.

Executive Director of Humane Society International/EU, Ruud Tombrock, said they were thrilled to see such an unequivocal pledge from the Norwegian government. Factory farming of wild animals for fur in appalling conditions is unconscionably cruel. To see a ban on this terrible trade in a Scandinavian country is truly historic. He also said he hoped the fur farmers would decide to dismantle their business before the deadline.

Los Angeles is a famous city to ban fur. Countries and cities around the world are catching up. They have also begun to shut down fur farms and prohibit the sale of fur. 

Businesses and consumers recognize that innovative faux-fur (fake fur) fabrics are better for our environment. It spares these poor animals’ lives.

Fake fur is also known as pile fabric and engineered to have the appearance and warmth of animal fur. It was first presented to the market around 1929.

Switzerland, Germany, and Sweden have regulations requiring such high welfare standards that they effectively make it impossible to continue to farm animals for fur.  

Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/oikeuttaelaimille/

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