Meet Lotus, The Maine Coon Cat Who is Almost as Tall as His Owner

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Maine coon cats are apparently of the oldest breeds in North America. They are beautiful, intelligent, gentle, playful, royalty, majestic among the cat world, and expensive. They are docile, yet have an energetic temperament. Those are the key reasons why this breed is so loved.

The size of a Maine coon cat sets them apart from other breeds. Lotus, a Maine coon cat, even has his own Instagram account with roughly 357k followers to date. 

Lotus is almost as tall as his owner, standing on his two legs. 

Instagam/lotus_the_mainecoon

According to his owner Lindstein, when people first see him, they think he is a mini lynx, and others think he looks like a little lion.

Lindstein had to make a few adjustments in their home, mainly to his bathroom, as he needs extra large plastic storage bin to do his business.

When he travels, Lotus can’t fit in a regular cat carrier; he has to ride around in a huge dog crate.

Lotus lives in Sweden and loves spending time outside, going on hikes, relaxing in the backyard, and visiting many beautiful places with his human family and his Maine coon sister Marion. He doesn’t mind putting on his harness to go for walks.

It has been said that Main coon cats can weigh anywhere from about 35-60 pounds. On average, the male Maine Coon will grow larger than their female counterpart.

As Maine coon cats are one of the world’s largest cats, Lotus is not alone in size. Yet it is incredible to see how big and majestic he is in his photos below.

Instagam/lotus_the_mainecoon
Instagam/lotus_the_mainecoon
Instagam/lotus_the_mainecoon
Instagam/lotus_the_mainecoon
Instagam/lotus_the_mainecoon
Instagam/lotus_the_mainecoon
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bnx3NbVlunz/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=embed_video_watch_again

However, the general consensus is that the oldest domesticated breed of cat globally is the Egyptian Mau.

Thanks to Instagram/lotus_the_mainecoon for permission to use his photos.

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