From Police Dog Hero To Britain’s Got Talent – He Certainly has Got Talent

- in Animals
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Finn, a German Shepherd, retired police dog, is considered a hero.

Finn’s handler, PC Dave Wardell operating in the Police Dog Unit were called to an incident in Stevenage in October 2016, to search for a male suspect believed to be armed. 

Finn and his handler located the suspect, where PC Wardell shouted a warning and released Finn. The dog seized the youth by his leg as he was attempting to escape over a fence.

The suspect fell to the ground, and stabbed Finn in his chest and again in his head and PC Wardell’s hand. Amazingly Finn still retained his grip on the suspect enabling PC Wardell to disarm the youth.

Finn was later taken to a veterinarian and then to a specialist. Finn was not in good shape as he had air leaking from his lungs. He received emergency surgery where part of his lung was removed.

Finn returned to duty eleven weeks later, and they were both back on the beat. On their first shift, Finn tracked a suspect and an arrest was made, which shows you can’t keep a good dog down.

At that time, Finn was possibly the most famous police dog in the UK as he saved PC Wardell’s life.

Due to this case, which received widespread media coverage, it highlighted the limited legal sanctions available against those who injure animals that are used by the emergency services.

An online petition, known as “Finn’s Law,” received more than 127,000 signatures resulting in the Sentencing Council’s recommendation that similar events would be treated as an “aggravated offense” rather than criminal damage.

PC Wardell campaigned for the new Animal Welfare (Service Animals) Act after Finn saved his life from the attack in Stevenage in 2016.

Finn retired at the age of eight and joined the Wardell family’s pets.

PC Wardell and Finn appeared on the popular ITV variety show with a magic/telepathic act that moved the judges to tears. Dog and owner have a unique bond.

Check out this amazingly talented dog on Britain’s Got Talent below…

Image credits and more information @K9Finn

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