8 Year Old Girl Receives Gifts From Crows After Feeding Them For 4 Years

- in Animals, Uplifting
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via BoredPanda

Eight-year-old Gabi Mann from Seattle, Washington began feeding crows in her family’s garden since the age of four. It all started by accident, as she was prone to dropping food.

The birds began watching her for any scraps. Gabi noticed, and that’s when she purposely started feeding them her packed lunch to and from the bus stop. Soon enough, the crows were lining up waiting to greet Gabi at the bus stop hoping for more scraps.

via: Bored Panda

Plenty of people have bird feeders in their garden, or they throw out seeds for the birds, yet are very rarely reciprocated in any form. Gabi is a fortunate girl.

Gabi’s mother Lisa said she didn’t mind as Gabi loved animals, yet she admits she only took notice since her daughter took an interest in them.

Later they started offering the crows food as a daily ritual rather than giving them the occasional scraps. In the mornings, they would fill the birdbath with fresh water and place peanuts on the bird feeder tray, as well as dog food on the grass. As they are busy doing the ritual, the crows would assemble on the telephone lines chirping loudly to them.

The gifts started after this ritual; that’s when Gabi got rewards. The local crows would leave shiny trinkets on the empty tray. Awards showed up sporadically. Anything small and bright enough that would fit in a crows mouth.

Gabi received all kinds of gifts such as buttons, beads, paper clips, lego, and even a rotting crab claw.

via: Bored Panda
via: Bored Panda

Crows are very smart, but probably not as bright as ravens. Members of the crow family, such as ravens can mimic human speech. Apart from the normal caw noise, they emit several other sounds. Each one sends out a different message.

In Japan, the birds have learned to place a hard-shelled nut in the road and wait for a passing vehicle to crush the nut open so they can eat the interior.

Crows can hold grudges as well as recognize your face.

Professor John Marzluff, of wildlife science at the University of Washington says if you would like to form a bond with crows, you would have to be consistent in rewarding them.

via: Bored Panda

Images via: Bored Panda

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