8 Strangest Waterfalls That Are Rare & Still Relatively Unknown To Many People

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These ten strangest waterfalls are very rare and still unknown to many people. Mother Nature is amazing. She created some weird, unique waterfalls all over the world. Some are so unique and unusual that they provoke disbelief and leave people in awe.

A waterfall is a river of water, melted ice, or other body of water that falls over rocky edges and plunge in pools of water. The process of erosion plays an essential part in the formation of waterfalls. Waterfalls are also known as cascades.

Some waterfalls may be temporary and flow only during rainstorms or when there is a significant amount of melted snow. The bottom of a waterfall is called a plunge pool, basin, or waterfall lake.

Ruby Falls in Chattanooga, Tennessee

Ruby Falls is in an underground cave with loads of history. Ruby Falls is breath-taking at 145-foot, which makes it the tallest underground waterfall open to the public. The temperature is around 60 degrees all year round.

ID 94048105 © Florentino David | Dreamstime.com

Ice Cave Waterfall.

Awe-inspiring glacier caves. They form naturally during summer, which carves long tunnels and caves underneath the thick sheets of ice and continuously changes. The light that reflects off the ice in the caves contributes to the magical, otherworldly looks.

ID 141353204 © Michal Balada | Dreamstime.com

Underwater Waterfall, Mauritius.

This underwater waterfall is an illusion and can only be seen from a birds-eye view. 

Aerial view of the underwater waterfall and Le Morne Brabant peninsula. Amazing Mauritius landscape

Blood Falls, Antarctica.

The red color of Blood Falls is known to be caused by microbes living off sulfur and iron and is assumed to be oxygen-free water trapped beneath the ice.
See the image in the video below.

The Bigăr Waterfall, Caraş-Severin County, Romania.

This waterfall is rare and spectacular due to the water spring that spreads over the moss of the cliff.

ID 149652692 © Miroslav Pavicevic | Dreamstime.com

Horizontal Falls, Kimberley, Western Australia.

The Horizontal Falls are formed by the massive tides that rise at such speeds, and large volumes of water gets trapped behind the rock walls. When the water is released, the tide turns, causing the waterfall to operate in reverse.

Fog Waterfall, Djupadal, Iceland.

The fog is believed to be caused by a temperature reversal when rising hot air serves as a seal and blocks the cold air caught beneath it.
See the image in the video below.

Horsetail Fall, Yosemite National Park, California.

Due to the position of the setting sun, the waterfall is illuminated, taking on a glowing red and orange color.

Check out this video of 8 above mentioned waterfalls as well as a few more strangest waterfalls in the world.

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